Pulaski County, Missouri Outdoors & Wildlife: Woodpeckers

Downy Woodpeckers have been identified in Pulaski County at Schlicht Springs Access, Bloodland Lake (Fort Leonard Wood), Dixon Towersite, Fort Leonard Wood Towersite, and Roubidoux Creek Conservation Area. Downy Woodpeckers are smaller than their lookalike, the Hairy Woodpecker. Being able to differentiate between the two is one of the first identification challenges that beginning bird watchers master. Downy Woodpeckers can be spotted in open woodlands habitats, city parks, and backyards. A Downy Woodpecker’s diet consist mainly of insects, although they will consume berries, acorns, and grains.

You can find Downy Woodpeckers in woodlots, residential areas, and city parks.

AllAboutBirds.org Cool Fact:
Woodpeckers don’t sing songs, but they drum loudly against pieces of wood or metal to achieve the same effect. People sometimes think this drumming is part of the birds’ feeding habits, but it isn’t. In fact, feeding birds make surprisingly little noise even when they’re digging vigorously into wood.

Downy Woodpeckers have been sighted at Schlicht Springs Access, Bloodland Lake (Fort Leonard Wood), Dixon Tower Site, Fort Leonard Wood Tower Site, and Roubidoux Creek Conservation Area in Pulaski County, MO.

Downy Woodpeckers have been sighted in several areas across Pulaski County, Missouri.

Hairy Woodpeckers have been identified in Pulaski County at Riddle Bridge Access. Larger than their lookalike, the Downy Woodpecker, its bill is much longer than the Downy Woodpecker. Hairy Woodpeckers are often sighted in mature woodlands, parks, and even cemeteries. A Hairy Woodpecker’s diet consist mainly of insects, although they will consume fruit and seeds.

You can spot a Hairy Woodpecker by watching the trunks and main branches of large trees, looking for a boldly patterned black-and-white bird.

AllAboutBirds.org Cool Fact:
Hairy Woodpeckers sometimes drink sap leaking from wells in the bark made by sapsuckers. They’ve also been seen pecking into sugar cane to drink the sugary juice.

Hairy Woodpeckers have been sighted at Riddle Bridge Gasconade River Access in Pulaski County, MO.

Hairy Woodpeckers have been sighted in Pulaski County, Missouri.

Northern Flickers have been identified in Pulaski County at Riddle Bridge Access, Dixon Towersite, Laughlin/Roubidoux Parks (Waynesville) and Roubidoux Creek Conservation Area. They are large brown woodpeckers with black-scalloped plumage. Northern Flickers can be seen in open woodland habitats. Northern Flickers diet consists mainly of insects. In winter they will eat fruits and seeds.

You can spot a Northern Flicker by walking through open woods or forest edges, but scan the ground. You may flush a flicker from a feeding spot up into a nearby tree.

AllAboutBirds.org Cool Fact:
Although it can climb up the trunks of trees and hammer on wood like other woodpeckers, the Northern Flicker prefers to find food on the ground. Ants are its main food, and the flicker digs in the dirt to find them. It uses its long barbed tongue to lap up the ants.

Northern Flickers have been spotted at Riddle Bridge Gasconade River Access, Dixon Tower Site, Waynesville's Laughlin and Roubidoux Parks, and Roubidoux Creek Conservation Area in Pulaski County, MO.

Northern Flickers have been spotted in several locations across Pulaski County, Missouri.

Pileated Woodpeckers have been spotted in Pulaski County at Ross Access, Schlicht Springs Access, Bloodland Lake (Fort Leonard Wood), Dixon Towersite, Fort Leonard Wood Towersite, Laughlin/Roubidoux Parks (Waynesville) Mitschele Access, Roubidoux Creek Conservation Access. They are very large woodpeckers- “one of the biggest, most striking forest birds on the continent. It’s nearly the size of a crow, black with bold white stripes down the neck and a flaming-red crest.” Pileated Woodpeckers live in mature woodlands and have an affinity for dead trees. They primarily eat carpenter ants.

You can spot a Pileated Woodpecker in stands of mature forest with plenty of dead trees and downed logs.

AllAboutBirds.org Cool Fact:
A Pileated Woodpecker pair stays together on its territory all year round. It will defend the territory in all seasons, but will tolerate new arrivals during the winter.

Pileated Woodpeckers have been identified at Ross Big Piney River Access, Schlicht Springs Gasconade River Access, Mitschele Gasconade River Access, and several other locations in Pulaski County, MO.

Pileated Woodpeckers have been identified in many areas across Pulaski County, Missouri.

Red-bellied Woodpeckers have been identified at Ryden Cave Conservation Area, Riddle Bridge Access, Schlicht Springs Access, Bloodland Lake (Fort Leonard Wood), Dixon Towersite, Fort Leonard Wood Towersite, Laughlin/Roubidoux Parks (Waynesville) Roubidoux Creek Conservation Area, and Mitschele Access, all in Pulaski County, Missouri. They are medium-sized woodpeckers about the same size as a Hairy Woodpecker. Red-bellied woodpeckers are often found in a forest habitat, especially in river bottoms. They mainly eat insects and spiders, but will also eat acorns and grapes.

Identify a Red-bellied Woodpecker by its call. Once you learn its rolling call, you’ll notice these birds everywhere.

AllAboutBirds.org Cool Fact:
A Red-bellied Woodpecker can stick out its tongue nearly 2 inches past the end of its beak. The tip is barbed and the bird’s spit is sticky, making it easier to snatch prey from deep crevices. Males have longer, wider-tipped tongues than females, possibly allowing a breeding pair to forage in slightly different places on their territory and maximize their use of available food.

Red-bellied Woodpeckers have been spotted at Ryden Cave Conservation Area and several other areas in Pulaski County, MO.

Red-bellied Woodpeckers have been spotted in many areas across Pulaski County, Missouri.

Red-headed Woodpeckers have been spotted at Dixon Towersite and Mitschele Access in Pulaski County, MO. This bird has been described as a “flying checkerboard”. Its head is crimson red, its body is white, and its wings are half white and half black. They are the only North American Woodpecker with an entirely red head and neck. Red-headed Woodpeckers breed in deciduous woodlands with oak or beech, groves of dead or dying trees, river bottoms, burned areas, recent clearings, beaver swamps, orchards, parks, farmland, grasslands with scattered trees, forest edges, and roadsides. They eat insects, fruits, and seeds. Like Lewis’s Woodpecker, Red-headed Woodpeckers are very adept at catching insects in the air.

Look for Red-headed Woodpeckers in scattered, open woodlots in agricultural areas and dead timber in swamps.

AllAboutBirds.org Cool Fact:
The striking Red-headed Woodpecker has earned a place in human culture. Cherokee Indians used the species as a war symbol, and it makes an appearance in Longfellow’s epic poem The Song of Hiawatha, telling how a grateful Hiawatha gave the bird its red head in thanks for its service.

Red-headed Woodpeckers have been sighted at Dixon Towersite and Mitschele Gasconade River Access in Pulaski County, MO.

Red-headed Woodpeckers have been sighted at Dixon Towersite and Mitschele Gasconade River Access in Pulaski County, Missouri.

Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers have been spotted at Ryden Cave Conservation Area and Ross Access in Pulaski County, Missouri. They are fairly small woodpeckers and prefer a forest habitat, especially forests with young birch and maple trees. Just as their name implies, Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers consume sap for the majority of their diet. They bore shallow holes in tree bark and lap up the leaking sap and any trapped insects with its specialized, brush-tipped tongue.

To find a sapsucker’s territory, keep an eye out for their distinctive, neatly organized rows of sapwells.

AllAboutBirds.org Cool Fact:
Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers have been found drilling sapwells in more than 1,000 species of trees and woody plants, though they have a strong preference for birches and maples.

Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers have been spotted by birders at Ryden Cave Conservation Area and Ross Big Piney River Access, near Fort Leonard Wood, in Pulaski County, MO.

Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers have been spotted by birders at Ryden Cave Conservation Area and Ross Big Piney River Access, near Fort Leonard Wood, in Pulaski County, MO.

To learn more about the size & shape, color pattern, behavior, habitat, food, nesting, migration, and conservation of Woodpeckers please visit www.allaboutbirds.org.

The Ozark Rivers Audubon Chapter meets the 2nd Thursday monthly at 7 pm at the Eugene F. Northern Community Center in Rolla, Missouri. You can visit them online at: http://ozarkriversaudubon.org/

For more information on bird watching in Missouri visit The Audubon Society of Missouri at http://www.mobirds.org.

For more information on birding, in Pulaski County, MO please read “Hitchhikers Guide To Birding In Pulaski County”

Take part in The Great Backyard Bird Count February 14-17, 2014! How many birds can you identify in your backyard and across Pulaski County? Tweet your Pulaski County wild bird photos to us at @PulCoUSA! #PulaskiCountyUSA

Tweet your wild bird pictures that were taken in #PulaskiCountyUSA to us! @PulCoUSA #BirdPulaski

Tweet your wild bird pictures that were taken in #PulaskiCountyUSA to us! @PulCoUSA #BirdPulaski

For more information about things to do in Pulaski County, Missouri visit Pulaski County Tourism Bureau at http://www.PulaskiCountyUSA.com or http://www.facebook.com/PulaskiCountyUSA.

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Hitchhikers Guide To Birding In Pulaski County

Are you a birder or a bird watcher? If so, flock to Pulaski County, Missouri! Over 400 different kinds of birds have been identified in the state, with over 100 species already identified in Pulaski County. Almost 40,000 acres of Mark Twain National Forest lie within our boundaries. Pulaski County also offers two Missouri Department of Conservation Areas, four public river accesses, two towersites, and an impressive public park system along the Roubidoux River in Waynesville.

Birding is the most popular spectator sport in Missouri and is a wholesome hobby and activity for all ages. Bird watching can provide quality one on one time with Mother Nature and is also a great way to introduce a younger generation to the great outdoors. Whether hiking, biking, or canoeing in Pulaski County, Missouri you will see songbirds, birds of prey and quite possibly the magnificent Bald Eagle.

Bloodland Lake (Fort Leonard Wood) is a popular fishing location that is handicap accessible. Anglers fish here for Bass and Sunfish. 36 wild bird species have been identified in this 40 acre wetlands habitat including Canada Goose, Northern Shoveler, Ring-necked Duck, Lesser Scaup, and Bufflehead.

Bufflehead, Ring-necked Duck, Canada Goose, and Northern Shoveler are waterfowl species that can be seen in the wild at Bloodland Lake on Fort Leonard Wood in Missouri. Birders have identified over 30 other species of wild birds in this area.

Bufflehead, Ring-necked Duck, Canada Goose, and Northern Shoveler are waterfowl species that can be seen in the wild at Bloodland Lake on Fort Leonard Wood in Missouri. Birders have identified over 30 other species of wild birds in this area.

Driving Directions to Bloodland Lake on Fort Leonard Wood: From I-44, take Exit 161. Go south on Business 44 to the front gate of Fort Leonard Wood. Obtain a map and directions at the front gate.

Lesser Scaup is a waterfowl species that can be seen in the wild at Bloodland Lake on Fort Leonard Wood in Missouri. Bird watchers ers have identified over 30 other species of wild birds in this area.

Lesser Scaup is a waterfowl species that can be seen in the wild at Bloodland Lake on Fort Leonard Wood in Missouri. Bird watchers ers have identified over 30 other species of wild birds in this area.


Missouri Department of Conservation Bloodland Lake Information:
http://mdc4.mdc.mo.gov/Applications/MOATLAS/AreaSummaryPage.aspx?txtAreaID=200301

Bloodland Lake Printable Field Checklist:

http://www.mobirds.org/cache/AreaChecklist.aspx?site=1217

Roubidoux Creek Conservation Area is over 175 acres and includes grassland, wetlands, and forest habitats. This area includes over 6 miles of Roubidoux Creek frontage and almost a half mile of Gasconade River frontage. Anglers fishing for Bass, Catfish, and Sunfish seek out the waters of the Gasconade while Trout anglers enjoy the Red Ribbon Trout Stream portion of the Roubidoux Creek. The Deer, Dove, Quail, Rabbit, Squirrel, and Turkey populations make this location popular with hunters also. Almost 100 species of wild birds have been identified in Roubidoux Creek Conservation Area including Wood Duck, Green Heron, Merlin, Wild Turkey, and numerous types of sparrows, tyrant flycatchers, wood warblers, and blackbirds and orioles.

Swamp Sparrow, Green Heron, Merlin, Nashville Warbler, Baltimore Oriole, and Le Conte's Sparrow are some of the wild bird species that have been identified at Pulaski County's Roubidoux Creek Conservation Area near Waynesville, MO.

Swamp Sparrow, Green Heron, Merlin, Nashville Warbler, Baltimore Oriole, and Le Conte’s Sparrow are some of the wild bird species that have been identified at Pulaski County’s Roubidoux Creek Conservation Area near Waynesville, MO.

Driving directions to Roubidoux Creek Conservation Area: From Interstate 44 take Exit 159. Travel west on Historic Route 66 (Highway 17) to Waynesville. After crossing the Roubidoux River Bridge make a right (north side) onto Revere Lane. Parking area is one mile north of Waynesville on the north side.

Northern Bobwhite, Wood Duck, Eurasian Collared-Dove, and Wild Turkey are some of the game birds that you will see at Roubidoux Creek Conservation Area near Waynesville, Missouri in Pulaski County.

Northern Bobwhite, Wood Duck, Eurasian Collared-Dove, and Wild Turkey are some of the game birds that you will see at Roubidoux Creek Conservation Area near Waynesville, Missouri in Pulaski County.

Missouri Department of Conservation Roubidoux Creek Area Information:
http://mdc4.mdc.mo.gov/applications/moatlas/AreaSummaryPage.aspx?txtAreaID=9130

Roubidoux Creek Conservation Area Printable Field Checklist:
http://www.mobirds.org/CACHE/AreaChecklist.aspx?site=795

Ryden Cave Conservation Area is a remote 30 acre area that includes two caves, Ryden Cave and Stockpen Cave. Both caves are closed to the public to help prevent the spread of White-nose syndrome in bats. However the area is open for birding and 15 species have been identified to date including Red-bellied Woodpecker, White-throated Sparrow, and Dark-eyed Junco.

At Ryden Cave Conservation Area in Pulaski County, near the community of Duke, Missouri birders will see White-throated Sparrow and Dark-eyed Junco.

At Ryden Cave Conservation Area in Pulaski County, near the community of Duke, Missouri birders will see White-throated Sparrow and Dark-eyed Junco.

Driving directions to Ryden Cave Conservation Area: From I-44 take Exit 169 and go south approximately 17 miles on J Highway. Turn right on K Highway. Continue onto Western Road. Continue onto County Road TT-825. Ryden Cave Conservation Area is on the left (south) side.

Bird watchers will also have an opportunity to spot Red-bellied Woodpeckers in the wild at Ryden Cave Conservation Area in Pulaski County.

Bird watchers will also have an opportunity to spot Red-bellied Woodpeckers in the wild at Ryden Cave Conservation Area in Pulaski County.

Missouri Department of Conservation Ryden Cave Conservation Area Information:
http://mdc4.mdc.mo.gov/Applications/MOATLAS/AreaSummaryPage.aspx?txtAreaID=7822

Ryden Cave Conservation Area Printable Field Checklist:

http://mobirds.org/CACHE/AreaChecklist.aspx?site=796

Mitschele Access includes a boat ramp which makes it a popular spot with boaters in Pulaski County. Canoeist also use this public access when starting or ending a float trip along the winding Gasconade River. This one acre area has a good population of Bass, Catfish, and Sunfish and a fair population of Suckers. Wild birds also enjoy Mitschele Access- over 30 species have been identified here, including: Louisiana Waterthrush, Eastern Kingbird, Carolina Wren and Red-winged Blackbird.

Mitschele Access, on the Gasconade River near Richland, Missouri, is a favorite spot for bird watchers to observe Eastern Kingbird, Red-winged Blackbird, and Carolina Wren.

Mitschele Access, on the Gasconade River near Richland, Missouri, is a favorite spot for bird watchers to observe Eastern Kingbird, Red-winged Blackbird, and Carolina Wren.

Mitschele Access is a great birding location year round with Spring, Summer, and Autumn the most active. Cliff Swallows can be seen nesting on the bridge.

Birders can also spot Louisiana Waterthrush at Mitschele Access in Pulaski County, Missouri.

Birders can also spot Louisiana Waterthrush at Mitschele Access in Pulaski County, Missouri.

Driving directions to Mitschele Access: From Interstate 44 take Exit 150. Travel north on Highway 7 about 3 miles to the Gasconade River Bridge. Entrance to the access is on the left (north) side of Missouri Highway 7.

Missouri Department of Conservation Mitschele Access Information:
http://mdc4.mdc.mo.gov/Applications/MOATLAS/AreaSummaryPage.aspx?txtAreaID=9801

Mitschele Access Printable Field Checklist:
http://www.mobirds.org/CACHE/AreaChecklist.aspx?site=792

Riddle Bridge Access also includes a boat ramp which makes it a popular spot with boaters in Pulaski County. Canoeist also use this public access when starting or ending a float trip along the twisting Gasconade River. This 9 acre area includes wetland, grassland, and forest and woodland habitats. Riddle Bridge Access has a good population of Bass, Catfish, and Sunfish and a fair population of Crappie. The bridge is the start of an 18-inch Smallmouth Bass Special Management Area that extends to the Route D bridge at Jerome in Phelps County. Popular with canoeist and anglers, Riddle Access is also a great spot for birding. Almost twenty species have been identified here including several types of woodpeckers, Tufted Titmouse, White-breasted Nuthatch, and Turkey Vulture.

Wild birds are plentiful at Riddle Bridge Access near Saint Robert, Missouri. Tufted Titmouse, Turkey Vulture, and White-breasted Nuthatch have been identified here.

Wild birds are plentiful at Riddle Bridge Access near Saint Robert, Missouri. Tufted Titmouse, Turkey Vulture, and White-breasted Nuthatch have been identified here.

Driving directions to Riddle Bridge Access: From I-44 take Exit 161 and travel six miles south of Saint Robert on Highway Y. The entrance is on the left immediately before the Gasconade River Bridge.

Missouri Department of Conservation Riddle Bridge Access Information:
http://mdc4.mdc.mo.gov/Applications/MOATLAS/AreaSummaryPage.aspx?txtAreaID=6409

Riddle Bridge Access Printable Field Checklist:
http://www.mobirds.org/CACHE/AreaChecklist.aspx?site=793

Ross Access is popular with canoeist on the scenic Big Piney River. This 4+ acre area has a good population of Bass, Catfish, and Sunfish and a fair population of Crappie. A portion of this area is a 15-inch Smallmouth Bass Special Management Area. It is also a popular place for swimming and rock skipping. Almost a dozen species of wild birds have been identified in this forest and woodland habitat, including Great Egret, Bald Eagle, Red-shouldered Hawk, and Yellow-belted Sapsucker.

Bird watchers might spot a majestic Bald Eagle at Ross Access in southern Pulaski County, Missouri. Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, Red-shouldered Hawk, and Great Egret have also been identified at Ross Access on the Big Piney River.

Bird watchers might spot a majestic Bald Eagle at Ross Access in southern Pulaski County, Missouri. Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, Red-shouldered Hawk, and Great Egret have also been identified at Ross Access on the Big Piney River.

Driving directions to Ross Access: From I-44 take Exit 169 and go south approximately 17 miles on J Highway. Turn right on K Highway and travel approximately 2.5 miles onto Western Road. Take Western Road to Windsor Lane. Go approximately 0.5 mile north on Windsor Lane.

Missouri Department of Conservation Ross Access Information:
http://mdc4.mdc.mo.gov/Applications/MOATLAS/AreaSummaryPage.aspx?txtAreaID=6306

Ross Access Printable Field Checklist:
http://www.mobirds.org/CACHE/AreaChecklist.aspx?site=794

Schlicht Springs Access is a 12 acre handicap accessible area near the former Schlicht Mill, dating back to the 1840’s, which was once a popular resort and boasted a lodge, post office, and general store. The area was named after John Schlicht who purchased the mill in 1876. Today, Schlicht Springs is popular with boaters and canoeist for its boat ramp. It is also popular with anglers who fish the Gascoande River’s good population of Bass, Catfish, and Sunfish and its fair population of Crappie. The area is made up of grassland and forest and woodland habitat. Birders have identified over 20 species of wild birds including Sharp-shinned Hawk, Downy Woodpecker, Blue-gray Gnatcatcher, and Kentucky Warbler.

Birders might see Kentucky Warbler, Blue-gray Gnatcatcher, Downy Woodpecker, Sharp-shinned Hawk and many other species of wild birds at Schlicht Springs Access near Crocker, Missouri

Birders might see Kentucky Warbler, Blue-gray Gnatcatcher, Downy Woodpecker, Sharp-shinned Hawk and many other species of wild birds at Schlicht Springs Access near Crocker, Missouri


Driving directions to Schlicht Springs Access:
Traveling from Crocker Missouri, take Highway 133 which heads south and west of Crocker approximately five miles to Resort Road. Turn south (Left) on Resort Road and travel approximately 1.25 miles to Riverside Road. Turn east (left) on Riverside road and travel approximately one mile to the access.

Missouri Department of Conservation Schlicht Springs Access Information:
http://mdc4.mdc.mo.gov/Applications/MOATLAS/AreaSummaryPage.aspx?txtAreaID=7511

Schlicht Springs Access Printable Field Checklist:
http://www.mobirds.org/CACHE/AreaChecklist.aspx?site=797

Dixon Towersite is known for its good population of deer, squirrel, and turkey and is accessible to hunters. Most of this areas 48 acres is Oak-hickory forest and woodland. 22 species of birds have been identified here including Turkey Vulture, Barred Owl, Mourning Dove, and several types of woodpeckers.

Mourning Dove has been identified at Dixon Towersite in Pulaski County, Missouri.

Mourning Dove has been identified at Dixon Towersite in Pulaski County, Missouri.

Bird watchers have also spotted Barred Owl and Turkey Vulture at Dixon Towersite near Dixon, Missouri.

Bird watchers have also spotted Barred Owl and Turkey Vulture at Dixon Towersite near Dixon, Missouri.

In late spring and summer expect to see Pine Warblers, Chipping Sparrows, Eastern Wood-Pewee and Great Crested Flycatchers.

In late spring and summer expect to see Pine Warblers, Chipping Sparrows, Eastern Wood-Pewee and Great Crested Flycatchers at Dixon Towersite in Pulaski County.

In late spring and summer expect to see Pine Warblers, Chipping Sparrows, Eastern Wood-Pewee and Great Crested Flycatchers at Dixon Towersite in Pulaski County.

Driving Directions to Dixon Towersite: Travel three miles west of Dixon on Highway 133. Site entrance is on the left (southeast) side.

Missouri Department of Conservation Dixon Towersite Information:
http://mdc4.mdc.mo.gov/applications/moatlas/AreaSummaryPage.aspx?txtAreaID=4904

Dixon Towersite Printable Field Checklist:
http://www.mobirds.org/cache/AreaChecklist.aspx?site=789

Fort Leonard Wood Towersite is also known for its good population of deer, squirrel, and turkey and is accessible to hunters. This area has over 60 acres of forest and woodland and 26 species of wild birds have been identified here. Some of these include Great Horned Owl, Red-tailed Hawk, and Purple Martin.

Birders have spotted Purple Martin, Red-tailed Hawk, and Great Horned Owl at Fort Leonard Wood Towersite in St. Robert, Missouri.

Birders have spotted Purple Martin, Red-tailed Hawk, and Great Horned Owl at Fort Leonard Wood Towersite in Saint Robert, Missouri.

Driving Directions to Fort Leonard Wood Towersite: From Interstate 44 take Exit 161. Travel one mile east of Saint Robert on Z Highway. Entrance is on the right (south) side.

Missouri Department of Conservation Fort Leonard Wood Towersite Information:
http://mdc4.mdc.mo.gov/applications/moatlas/AreaSummaryPage.aspx?txtAreaID=4622

Fort Leonard Wood Towersite Printable Field Checklist:

http://www.mobirds.org/CACHE/AreaChecklist.aspx?site=790

Laughlin/Roubidoux Parks (Waynesville)is part of the public park system in the city of Waynesville. This site includes a town habitat and frontage on Roubidoux Creek. This area includes White Ribbon and Red Ribbon Trout Areas. Roubidoux Spring has a flow of almost 38,000,000 gallons per day and is also a popular recreational spot for cave certified scuba divers. Laughlin Park is also one of only seven sites on the Trail of Tears National Historic Trail in Missouri. Waynesville also maintains a tree identification area in Roubidoux Park. A brochure is available at City Hall, located at 601 Historic Route 66. Wild birds love Laughlin/Roubidoux Parks as well, with over 50 species identified to date. Some of these include Mallard, Great Blue Heron, Ruby-throated Hummingbird, Northern Cardinal, Indigo Bunting, and Song Sparrow.

Laughlin/Roubidoux Parks (Waynesville) is an urban wild bird oasis. Bird watchers have identified Ruby-throated Hummingbird, Great Blue Heron, Indigo Bunting, and Song Sparrow. More than 40 other species have also been spotted at the parks.

Laughlin/Roubidoux Parks (Waynesville) is an urban wild bird oasis. Bird watchers have identified Ruby-throated Hummingbird, Great Blue Heron, Indigo Bunting, and Song Sparrow. More than 40 other species have also been spotted at the parks.

Driving directions to Laughlin/Roubidoux Parks (Waynesville): From Interstate 44 take Exit 159. Travel west on Historic Route 66 (Highway 17) to Waynesville. Laughlin Park is on the left (south)side immediately before crossing the Roubidoux River and Roubidoux Park is on the right (north) side immediately before the bridge crossing. Both parks are downstream from Roubidoux Spring.

Laughlin/Roubidoux Parks (Waynesville) is an urban wild bird oasis. Bird watchers have identified Ruby-throated Hummingbird, Great Blue Heron, Indigo Bunting, and Song Sparrow. More than 40 other species have also been spotted at the parks.

Laughlin and Roubidoux Parks in Waynesville are a great place to see Northern Cardinal.

Mallards enjoy the waters of the "Roaring Roubidoux" as much as humans do!

Mallards enjoy the waters of the “Roaring Roubidoux” as much as humans do!

Missouri Department of Conservation Laughlin/Roubidoux Parks Information:
http://mdc4.mdc.mo.gov/Applications/MOATLAS/AreaSummaryPage.aspx?txtAreaID=9244

Laughlin/Roubidoux Parks (Waynesville) Printable Field Checklist:

http://www.mobirds.org/CACHE/AreaChecklist.aspx?site=798

Tweet your Pulaski County wild bird photos to us at @PulCoUSA! #PulaskiCountyUSA

Tweet your wild bird pictures that were taken in #PulaskiCountyUSA to us! @PulCoUSA #BirdPulaski

Tweet your wild bird pictures that were taken in #PulaskiCountyUSA to us! @PulCoUSA #BirdPulaski

For more information about things to do in Pulaski County, Missouri visit Pulaski County Tourism Bureau at http://www.PulaskiCountyUSA.com or http://www.facebook.com/PulaskiCountyUSA.

For more information on bird watching in Missouri visit The Audubon Society of Missouri at http://www.mobirds.org or http://www.facebook.com/153704444682191.