History & Heroes: Five Fast Facts- Cyrus Colley

Pulaski County Missouri History and Heroes

Cyrus Colley is the namesake of Colley Hollow, west of Waynesville in Pulaski County, Missouri. Colley settled on 300 acres of land there in 1832.

1. “Cyrus Colley found on his farm an artistically made rock pipe-bowl, so well preserved that one of his ‘hired men’ fixed a stem to it and enjoyed a modern weed, smoking in its bowl, as no doubt some ancient weed comforted its ancient owner- Mound Builder or Indian, as he may have been.”

2. Colley was appointed by the Pulaski County court to sell the lots of Waynesville. He had assisted in “laying out” the town.

3. “When the Texas agitation began to spread over the country, Pulaski County took up the cause as vigorously as any part of the Union. Mass-meetings were held in two different places; one at Bates’ (now Bartlett’s) Mill, and another at Waynesville. At the latter place a company was made up and organized by Cyrus Colley. They kept regular muster days for a time, but as no call was received from the authorities, they were disbanded.”

4. On January 30, 1857 Missouri Governor Trusten Polk signed “An Act to Incorporate the Waynesville Academy. The legislation named Colley and other prominent Pulaski County pioneers as “trustees of the Waynesville Academy.” A lot for the Academy was secured on the hill south of the courthouse and the lumber was on the ground at the site. However, the Academy was not constructed, and the materials were later sold at auction.

5. Colley, along with George M. Jamison (Crawford County) and Gideon R. West (Osage County) was appointed to locate the seat of Phelps County in November 1857.

Sources:
History of Laclede, Camden, Dallas, Webster, Wright, Texas, Pulaski, Phelps and Dent Counties, The Goodspeed Publishing Company, 1889, Reprinted 1974. Available online at: http://cdm16795.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/ref/collection/mocohist/id/71191
Rolla Herald (Rolla, Missouri) 28 August 1941

History & Heroes: Five Fast Facts is an occasional series of interesting facts regarding namesakes and historical figures in Pulaski County, Missouri.

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History & Heroes: Five Fast Facts- Joseph W. McClurg

Pulaski County Missouri History and Heroes

Joseph W. McClurg, 19th Governor of Missouri, was the namesake of McClurg Street at Richland, Missouri in Pulaski County.

Joseph_W._McClurg_-_Brady-Handy

Joseph Washington McClurg. Image by Mathew Brady, retrieved via Wikipedia.com.

1. McClurg once served as deputy Sheriff in Saint Louis County.

2. An 1893 Shelbina Democrat news article describes McClurg as “an Ozark pioneer” and “The Prince of Merchants.”

3. To curb the rising costs of salt to his customers, McClurg, then a merchant at Hazelwood, Missouri, rode on horseback to Jacksonport, Arkansas where he boarded a steamer to New Orleans. At the Crescent City he purchased 1,000 sacks of salt. He loaded the commodity on a northbound steamship returning to Jacksonport. The country between Jacksonport and Hazelwood was “wild and traversed only by tortuous trails, which could hardly be called roads.” Undaunted, McClurg cut and partly graded a hundreds mile long wagon road through the rugged region. In 1893 this road, known as McClurg’s Old Salt Road, was “one of the most noted highways of the Ozarks.”

4. In 1871, Joseph Washington McClurg returned to Linn Creek to resume his business enterprises. Along with his sons-in-law Charles Draper and Marshall Johnson, McClurg founded Draper, McClurg and Company. Merchandising profits funded surface mining on lead and iron in the Central Lead District near the Osage River. The firm operated steamboats on the Missouri and Osage Rivers and their landings became trade centers for the shipment of railroad ties. The company gained government contracts for the removal of sandbars on the Osage River. By 1885, falling profits lead to the seizure of one of the steamboats by creditors and within a year, McClurg sold his Camden County properties.

5. McClurg resided in Lebanon, Missouri at the time of his death December 2, 1900. He was laid to rest at Lebanon City Cemetery. On December 7th, 1904 Grand Army of the Republic (GAR) members alongside their Confederate counterparts paid tribute to the former Governor at the unveiling of a monument erected by the State of Missouri at McClurg’s gravesite. The monument stands 22 feet high and is made of granite from Barre, Vermont. It rests on a bottom base 6 feet square, surmounted by a second base 4 feet, 5 inches square, which is surrounded by a die 3 feet 4 inches square upon which rests the shaft 16 feet long. The monument was featured on tourist maps produced during the WPA era.

Sources:
https://web.archive.org/web/20120411091708/http://www.sos.mo.gov/archives/resources/findingaids/rg003-19.pdf
Shelbina Democrat (Shelbina, Missouri)25 October 1893
Gasconade County Republican (Owensville, Missouri) 9 December 1904

History & Heroes: Five Fast Facts is an occasional series of interesting facts regarding namesakes and historical figures in Pulaski County, Missouri.

History & Heroes: Five Fast Facts- Uriel Crocker

Pulaski County Missouri History and Heroes

Uriel Crocker, publisher and member of the board of directors of South Pacific Railroad, was the namesake of Crocker, Missouri in Pulaski County. Beginning as early as the 1920’s Mr. Crocker has often accidentally been misidentified as Eurilis J. Crocker.*

Uriel Crocker via Wiki Commons.

Uriel Crocker via Wiki Commons.

1. Crocker’s grandfather, Josiah Crocker, was a great admirer of Milton’s “Paradise Lost.” Crocker is named after a character in the poem.

2. In the early 1820’s Crocker convinced his publishing partner, Samuel T. Armstrong, to stereotype the six volumes of “Scott’s Family Bible.” It was the first time that such a large work was stereotyped in the United States of America. Crocker & Brewster also introduced into Boston the first iron-lever printing press. They also printed from the first power press.

3. As a boy Crocker witnessed Floyd Ireson being dragged along the street in a dory by a mob of men and boys who later tarred and feathered Ireson. The episode was later memorialized in John Greenleaf Whittier’s poem “Skipper Ireson’s Ride.”

4. Crocker was one of the original Corporators of the Franklin Savings Bank of the City of Boston.

5. Crocker served as Director of Atlantic and Pacific Railroad Company from 1868 until 1874. He served as Director of South Pacific Railroad in 1870 and as director of St. Louis & San Francisco Railroad Company in 1877.

* ”History of Laclede, Camden, Dallas, Webster, Wright, Texas, Pulaski, Phelps and Dent counties, Missouri” published by Goodspeed Publishing Company in 1889, states, in reference to Crocker, “The growth has been slow but continuous since the town was laid out in 1869 by the railway company, who gave it the name it bears in honor of one of its prominent men.” No records could be found for Eurilis J. Crocker. However, Uriel Crocker was a prominent South Pacific Railroad shareholder before being elected to the board of directors in 1870. (Researched by Laura Huffman 2009-2018)

Sources:
https://archive.org/stream/memorialofurielc00crocrich/memorialofurielc00crocrich_djvu.txt

History & Heroes: Five Fast Facts is an occasional series of interesting facts regarding namesakes and historical figures in Pulaski County, Missouri.

History & Heroes: Five Fast Facts- Mark Hanna

Pulaski County Missouri History and Heroes

Marcus Alonzo Hanna, Ohio Senator, was the namesake of the community and post office of Hanna, Missouri in Pulaski County.

Mark Hanna photographed in 1896 by W. J. Root.

Mark Hanna photographed in 1896 by W. J. Root.

1. Hanna attended the same public school, Cleveland (OH) Central High School, as John D. Rockefeller. Hanna attended Western Reserve College but was expelled for a prank.

2. Hanna, who “had as much to do with the election of [President] Mr. Garfield as any single individual in the country,” oversaw Garfield’s body after it arrived in Cleveland following the assassination of the President. Hanna was also in charge of Garfield’s funeral arrangements and burial.

3. Hanna was instrumental in the election of William McKinley as President in 1896. A New York reporter wrote “Hanna and the others will shuffle and deal him [McKinley] like a pack of cards.” The campaign to elect McKinley, organized by Hanna, raised $3.5 million dollars- the largest election fundraising at that time. Hanna had been credited with the invention of the modern presidential campaign.

4. After winning the Presidency, McKinley offered the Secretary of State position to Senator John Sherman. Sherman accepted which led to Ohio Governor Asa Bushnell appointing Hanna in Senator Sherman’s place.

5. Hanna was no fan of Theodore Roosevelt. He once stated “Here’s this convention going headlong for Roosevelt for Vice President. Don’t any of you realize that there’s only one life between that madman and the Presidency? … What harm can he do as Governor of New York compared to the damage he will do as President if McKinley should die?” After the 1900 Republican Convention did indeed nominate Roosevelt to the ticket as McKinley’s Vice-President Hanna told President McKinley “Your duty to the country is to live for four years from next March.” McKinley won reelection and was assassinated in 1901. Roosevelt assumed the Presidency.

Sources:
https://www.cleveland.com/opinion/index.ssf/2012/10/how_ohio_made_a_president_mark.html
https://potus-geeks.livejournal.com/759386.html

History & Heroes: Five Fast Facts is an occasional series of interesting facts regarding namesakes and historical figures in Pulaski County, Missouri.

 

History & Heroes: Five Fast Facts- Champ Clark

Pulaski County Missouri History and Heroes

James Beauchamp “Champ” Clark was the namesake of Clark National Forest in Missouri. A portion of this National Forest was located within the boundaries of Pulaski County, Missouri. In 1973 CNF was “administratively combined” with Mark Twain National Forest. In 1976 Clark National Forest was absorbed by Mark Twain National Forest. 39,177 acres of MTNF are located inside Pulaski County.

“Champ” Clark as photographed by Fred Hartsook circa 1915. Retrieved via Library of Congress Prints and Photographs division.

1. Clark was expelled from Kentucky University (now Transylvania University) after firing a pistol at one of his roommates in self-defense during a quarrel. Two years later he was invited to return but he chose Bethany College instead. He graduated first in his class in 1873
2. Clark fervently believed that a good speech needed to include information from literature and history. “The wealth of his biographical material, his quotations, and his historical allusions, as well as the manner in which he adapted them to his speeches” earned him the title the “Leather-Bound Orator.”
3. In 1911, while representing Missouri’s Ninth District in the United States House of Representatives Clark was elected Speaker of the House. Clark has been described as “a fiery orator, a challenging foe in debate, and a witty, but nonetheless perceptive spokesman for the Democratic party.” He remains the only Speaker of the House from the Show Me State.
4. Clark was a shoe-in for the 1912 Democratic Presidential nomination (and most likely the Presidency) until he wasn’t. Clark never received the two-thirds majority at the Baltimore Convention. After forty-six rounds of voting the nod went to Woodrow Wilson who was elected the twenty-eighth President of the United States.
5. Clark’s residence in Bowling Green, Missouri, nicknamed Honeyshuck, is a National Historic Landmark.

Sources:
https://shsmo.org/historicmissourians/name/c/clark
http://digital.shsmo.org/cdm/ref/collection/mhr/id/28139
https://dnr.mo.gov/shpo/nps-nr/76001114.pdf

History & Heroes: Five Fast Facts is an occasional series of interesting facts regarding namesakes and historical figures in Pulaski County, Missouri.

History & Heroes: Five Fast Facts- Mark Twain

Pulaski County Missouri History and Heroes

Mark Twain National Forest in southern and central Missouri is named in honor of author, newspaperman, and humorist Mark Twain. 39,177 acres of MTNF are located in Pulaski County in the Houston-Rolla-Cedar Creek Ranger District.

Samuel Clemens, pen name Mark Twain, as photographed in 1871 by Mathew Brady. Retrieved via Library of Congress Prints and Photographs division. This work is in the public domain in its country of origin and other countries and areas where the copyright term is the author's life plus 100 years or less.

Samuel Clemens, pen name Mark Twain, as photographed in 1871 by Mathew Brady. Retrieved via Library of Congress Prints and Photographs division. This work is in the public domain in its country of origin and other countries and areas where the copyright term is the author’s life plus 100 years or less.

1. Mark Twain was born Samuel Langhorne Clemens in Florida, Missouri. He grew up alongside the Mississippi River in Hannibal. His pen name, Mark Twain, was a riverboat term that he would have heard frequently as a child and used often during his career as a steamboat pilot.
2. Twain was also an inventor. In 1871 he received the patent for an adjustable garment strap. In 1873 he invented and patented a self-pasting scrapbook. In 1891 he marketed his patented “Mark Twain’s Memory Builder Game.”
3. The Panic of 1893 pushed Twain’s publishing firm into bankruptcy in 1894. This led to potential personal bankruptcy. To stave off his own bankruptcy Twain made a year-long around-the-world lecture tour to pay off his debts.
4. In 1900 Twain traveled to England to argue copyright law before the House of Lords.
5. In 1998 the Kennedy Center established the Mark Twain Prize for American Humor. Recipients include Lily Tomlin, George Carlin, and Ellen DeGeneres.

Sources:
https://www.marktwainmuseum.org/twains-life-and-works
http://biography.yourdictionary.com/articles/facts-about-mark-twain.html

History & Heroes: Five Fast Facts is an occasional series of interesting facts regarding namesakes and historical figures in Pulaski County, Missouri.

History & Heroes: Five Fast Facts- Leonard Wood

Pulaski County Missouri History and Heroes

Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri is named in honor of United States Army officer Leonard Wood.

General Leonard Wood, via Wikimedia Commons.

General Leonard Wood, via Wikimedia Commons.

1. Wood served as personal physician to Presidents Grover Cleveland and William McKinley.
2. Wood, and future president Theodore Roosevelt, organized the Rough Riders, “one of the most unique army units the world has ever seen.” The unit was comprised of “western fighters and bronco-busters.”
3. While Military Governor of Cuba (1898-1902) Wood sanctioned Walter Reed, a U.S. Army physician, to carry out experiments that confirmed the theory that yellow fever is transmitted by mosquitoes. Wood called the conquest of yellow fever “worth the cost of the war, and probably the most important (advance) in the field of medicine since the discovery of the vaccination.”
4. Wood received the literary wrath of popular American author Mark Twain after the First Battle of Bud Dajo, also known as the Moro Crater Massacre.
5. Wood, on former President Roosevelt’s recommendation, ran for the 1920 Republican Party presidential nomination. Warren G. Harding prevailed and went on to win the presidency.

Sources:
http://www.theodorerooseveltcenter.org
The Marion Star (Marion, Ohio), 6 January 1919
http://www.ralphmag.org/EC/yellow-fever.html
Samuel Clemens, “Comments on the Moro Massacre” (12 March 1906)

History & Heroes: Five Fast Facts is an occasional series of interesting facts regarding namesakes and historical figures in Pulaski County, Missouri.