4 Things You Will Love About Old Settlers Day!

Old Settlers Day has been a beloved festival in Waynesville, Missouri since 1980. This year’s event is shaping up to be incredibly exciting! The entire weekend is jam packed with living history activities and things to see and do! Following are four things that you should not miss during the festivities:

1. The Camps– Be sure to visit the Union and Confederate camps. These camps are the living quarters for the re-enactors for the weekend. As living historians, the re-enactors are very detail orientated, and their camps present an authentic look at living conditions that soldiers experienced during the Civil War. General Grant’s Field Headquarters features a period telegraph office complete with an operator for demonstrations. Don’t miss the Kickapoo Trace Muzzleloaders Camp which highlights the mountain men who explored and settled our country before 1840. Their camp will include fire starting, trapping, dutch oven cooking, and blacksmithing demonstrations. The camps will be open to the public both Saturday and Sunday.

Blacksmith Courtesy of Civil War Courier

Courtesy of Civil War Courier

2. Drills & Inspections– Saturday will include horsemanship drills, infantry drills, cavalry drills, and artillery drills, beginning at 11:00 a.m.

Action Shot Courtesy of Civil War Courier

Courtesy of Civil War Courier

3. Reenactments– Reenactments will take place Saturday at 2:00 p.m. and Sunday at Noon. Saturday’s Civil War March reenactment will begin at the site of Fort Waynesville on Fort Street, proceed on Lynn Street to the site of the Old Stagecoach Stop and continue to Waynesville City Park. This march will reenact a notable event in Pulaski County’s Civil War history and will feature a skirmish that turns into a battle. Sunday’s battle reenactment begins at Noon at Waynesville City Park. History will come for alive for those in attendance.

2. Courtesy of Civil War Courier

Photo courtesy of Civil War Courier

4. President Abraham Lincoln and General U.S. Grant– Living historians will portray President Lincoln and General Grant during Old Settlers Day. President Lincoln (Lance Mack) will be a part of the opening ceremonies on stage at 10:00 a.m. and will also be speaking on stage, later that day, at 12:30 p.m. General Grant (Wayne Issleb) can be found at his Field Headquarters and will address the crowd Saturday, from the stage at 10:30 a.m.

3. Courtesy of Civil War Courier

Courtesy of Civil War Courier

In addition to these four things there is much more to see and do at Old Settlers Day! Make sure to:

Period Costume Civil War Courier

Courtesy of Civil War Courier

To learn more about Old Settlers Day visit www.Route66Courthouse.com and www.facebook.com/events/1668769670079314

To learn about more things to see and do in Pulaski County, Missouri, visit www.PulaskiCountyUSA.com

Correct 2016 OSDay Poster

2016 Old Settlers Day Schedule

 

This Week Around Pulaski County USA!

Pulaski County USA LogoEvents for the week of June 15, 2015-June 21, 2015

Welcome To The Following Groups:
June 19- Remember The Removal Riders
June 20- The Great Race

June 17-20- Pulaski County Regional Fair
What: Family friendly county fair
Where: St. Robert Community Center Fairground
When: Wednesday, Thursday, & Friday 4-11 pm, Saturday Noon-11:30 pm
Cost: FREE admission
Contact: Carl Boone- 816.261.6051

Pulaski County Regional Fair will be held in Saint Robert June 17th-20th!

Pulaski County Regional Fair will be held in Saint Robert June 17th-20th!

June 19- Unveiling of Trail of Tears Wayside Exhibits
What: Official unveiling of 7 Trail of Tears exhibits. Sponsored by National Park Service in partnership with Trail of Tears Association, City of Waynesville, and Pulaski County Tourism Bureau. Honored guests include Remember The Removal Riders.
Where: Laughlin Park, Waynesville
When: 9 am
Cost: FREE
Contact: Trail of Tears Association (Deloris Gray Wood)- 573.729.2545

Unveiling of seven Trail of Tears Wayside exhibits takes place in Laughlin Park June 19th. One of only seven certified sites in Missouri. Sponsored by  National Park Service in partnership with Trail of Tears Association, City of Waynesville, and Pulaski County Tourism Bureau. Honored guests include Remember The Removal Riders.

Unveiling of seven Trail of Tears Wayside exhibits takes place in Laughlin Park June 19th. One of only seven certified sites in Missouri. Sponsored by National Park Service in partnership with Trail of Tears Association, City of Waynesville, and Pulaski County Tourism Bureau. Honored guests include Remember The Removal Riders.

June 20- 16th Annual Volkslauf
What: 10K Mud Run hosted by United States Marine Corps
Where: Building 1702, Fort Leonard Wood
When: Check In begins at 6 am, Race begins at 8:30 am
Cost: $150 per adult team, $90 per youth team, $35 per individual. Pre race registration discounts.
Contact: Gunnery Sergeant Robert Sallee- 843.441.7526

Hosted by the United States Marine Corps Detachment at Fort Leonard Wood the 16th Annual Volkslauf is a motivated 10K Mud Run.

Hosted by the United States Marine Corps Detachment at Fort Leonard Wood the 16th Annual Volkslauf is a motivated 10K Mud Run.

June 20 & 21- Meyer Tree and Berry Farm
What: Pick your own blueberries
Where: 13018 Highway D, Dixon
When: Saturday 8 am-5 pm, Sunday Noon-5 pm
Cost: By the pound, call for pricing specifics
Contact: Meyer Tree & Berry Farm (Marvis Meyer)- 573.759.7998

Create lasting memories with your family as you pick your own blueberries at Meyer Tree and Berry Farm near Dixon, MO!

Create lasting memories with your family as you pick your own blueberries at Meyer Tree and Berry Farm near Dixon, MO!

June 20- Pulaski County Farmer’s Market
What: Year- round Farmer’s Market
Where: Downtown Waynesville
When: 8 am until Noon
Cost: FREE admission
Contact: Bruce Main- 573.842.9079

Pulaski County Farmer's Market is held year round in downtown Waynesville!

Pulaski County Farmer’s Market is held year round in downtown Waynesville!

June 20- 1903 Route 66 Courthouse Museum
What: One of only two remaining Route 66 period courthouses in Missouri. Listed in the National Register of Historic Places.
Where: On The Square, Waynesville
When: 10 am until 4 pm
Cost: FREE admission, donations accepted
Contact: Pulaski County Museum & Historical Society (Denise Seevers)-573.855.3644

Visit the Museums On The Square in downtown Waynesville! On the National Register of Historic Places!

Visit the Museums On The Square in downtown Waynesville! On the National Register of Historic Places!

June 20- Old Stagecoach Stop Museum
What: Pulaski County’s oldest building has served as a private residence, a stagecoach stop, a Civil War hospital, and a hotel on Historic Route 66. Listed in the National Register of Historic Places.
Where: On The Square, Waynesville
When: 10 am until 4 pm
Cost: FREE admission, donations accepted
Contact: Old Stagecoach Stop Foundation (Jan Primas)- 573.435.6766

June 20- 10th Annual USO Military Support Motorcycle Ride
What: 200+ riders support the military by supporting the USO
Where: Ride begins at Ozark Harley Davidson in Lebanon and ends at Route 66 Freedom Fest on the Square in Waynesville.
When: Registration begin at 10 am, ride departs at Noon.
Cost: $15 donation per motorcycle
Contact: Freedom Of Road Riders Local 28- 573.586.7221

Show your patriotic pride and support the USO and our military during this annual motorcycle ride!

Show your patriotic pride and support the USO and our military during this annual motorcycle ride!

June 20- Route 66 Freedom Fest
What: Family friendly street festival
Where: On the Square, Downtown Waynesville
When: 11 am-4 pm
Cost: FREE admission
Contact: Route 66 Fest On The Square (Audra Berrier)- 573.774.3001

Bring your family to downtown Waynesville for this street festival! Vintage cars from The Great Race will be on hand and watch 200+ motorcycles roll into town for the conclusion of the USO Support Ride.

Bring your family to downtown Waynesville for this street festival! Vintage cars from The Great Race will be on hand and watch 200+ motorcycles roll into town for the conclusion of the USO Support Ride.

June 20- Rockapalooza 2015
What: Live music festival
Where: Roadhouse Bar & Grill, Laquey
When: 2-11 pm
Cost: $7
Contact: KFLW (Tracy O’Quinn)- 573.336.5359

Looking Ahead-
June 23-27: Tri-County Fair
June 23-28: Meyer Tree and Berry Farm
June 27 & 28- 28th Annual Cave State Cruisers Car Show

Home to the 2015 National Speleological Society Convention
#NSS2015
July 13-17, 2015
Waynesville, MO
nss2015.caves.org
http://www.facebook.com/NSSConvention2015
twitter.com/NSS2015

National Speleological Society Convention will be held July 13-17, 2015 in Waynesville, Missouri.

National Speleological Society Convention will be held July 13-17, 2015 in Waynesville, Missouri.

A Featured Destination in FIREBALL RUN: America’s Frontier
Premiering Summer 2015

FIREBALL RUN: America's Frontier premiers in its entirety Summer 2015.

FIREBALL RUN: America’s Frontier premiers in its entirety Summer 2015.

Discover A Hidden History- Cherokee Trail of Tears Encampment Waynesville, Missouri

In 1830 Congress passed the Indian Removal Act, providing “for an exchange of lands with Indians residing in any states or territories, and for their removal west of the river Mississippi.” This act changed the Cherokee Nation forever. Their leaders fought against this act but by 1832 they were running out of options.

Trail of Tears Wayside Exhibit in Waynesville, MO

Trail of Tears Wayside Exhibit in Waynesville, MO

One by one, sometimes in chains, tribes were removed. The Choctaw, the Muscogee Creeks, the Chickasaw, the Seminoles were all forced from their homelands and moved to Indian Territory-now known as Oklahoma.

Trail of Tears Wayside Exhibit in Waynesville, MO

“A Trail of Tragedy”- Trail of Tears Wayside Exhibit in Waynesville, MO

In 1835, acting outside the authority of the Cherokee government, 20 tribal members, led by Major Ridge, signed the Treaty of New Echota. The conditions for removal were set: In exchange for $5 million the tribe would relocate to Indian Territory. Though the majority of Cherokee protested the agreement it was enacted into law by Congress in 1836. The treaty gave the Cherokee two years to voluntarily move.

Trail of Tears Wayside Exhibit in Waynesville, MO

“A Resting Place for the Weary”- Trail of Tears Wayside Exhibit in Waynesville, MO

Not surprisingly, most Cherokee refused to recognize the Treaty of New Echota. Few had moved at the end of the two year period. In 1838 General Winfield Scott and 7,000 soldiers, began a removal effort in Georgia. Cherokee families were uprooted and driven-sometimes at bayonet point to removal camps. In June of that year Cherokee were loaded by the Army onto flatboats and moved to Indian Territory. The first boat completed the journey in 13 days. Desertions and fatalities plagued the next two groups and the poorly supplied boats were ravaged by disease.

Trail of Tears Wayside Exhibit in Waynesville, MO

“Discover A Hidden History”- Trail of Tears Wayside Exhibit in Waynesville, MO

To save his people, Principal Chief John Ross petitioned General Scott to let the Cherokee control their own removal. Ross organized detachments of about 1,000 each and the Cherokee traveled by foot, horse, and wagon for 800 miles, taking up to eight months to reach Indian Territory. Two of these detachments camped at Roubidoux Spring in Waynesville- in December 1837 and March 1839. Details of these camps were recorded by Dr. W.I. Morrow, Reverend Daniel S. Butrick, and B.B. Cannon in their journals and diaries.

Trail of Tears Wayside Exhibit in Waynesville, MO

“Why Did The Cherokee Stop Here?”-Trail of Tears Wayside Exhibit in Waynesville, MO

The Cherokee suffered terribly during the hard winters. 15,000 Cherokee were forced from their homes and many hundreds died on the journey. Seventeen detachments of Cherokee arrived in Indian Territory in 1838 and 1839 and the tribe members began rebuilding their lives. Today the Cherokee and other removed tribes endure as vigorous Indian nations.

Trail of Tears Wayside Exhibit in Waynesville, MO

“A Road Through History”- Trail of Tears Wayside Exhibit in Waynesville, MO

The City of Waynesville and the Downtown Beautification Committee applied for, and received, certification as a site on the Trail of Tears National Historic Trail and in October of 2006, a Certification Ceremony was held in Laughlin Park, on the banks of the Roubidoux Creek. The National Park Service was represented by Aaron Mahr, who presented the certificate, and the Missouri Trail of Tears Association was represented by Deloris Wood. Laughlin Park is one of only seven certified sites in Missouri. Two others- Maramec Spring Park and Snelson-Brinker Cabin are only 45 miles from Laughlin Park. Certified sites can also be found in Pilot Knob, Springfield, Cassville, and Jackson.

Trail of Tears Wayside Exhibit in Waynesville, MO

“A Frigid Crossing”- Trail of Tears Wayside Exhibit in Waynesville, MO

On June 19th, 2015 The City of Waynesville, in conjunction with National Park Service, Trail of Tears Association, and Pulaski County Tourism Bureau will unveil seven Trail of Tears Wayside Exhibits. The exhibits begin at Roubidoux Spring and are located along the mile long walking path that follows the Roubidoux River. The event will begin at 9:00 a.m., rain or shine. The public is cordially invited and encouraged to attend. A reception, provided by Vidie’s Catering will follow. Honored guests will include the Cherokee Remember The Removal Riders.

"We traveled about 12 miles to a settlement... on the banks of a beautiful stream, named Rubedoo.  Here we had a delightful place, on the bank of the river, convenient to wood and water."- Rev. Daniel S. Butrick March 12, 1839

“We traveled about 12 miles to a settlement… on the banks of a beautiful stream, named Rubedoo. Here we had a delightful place, on the bank of the river, convenient to wood and water.”- Rev. Daniel S. Butrick March 12, 1839

Information in this article is via National Park Service Trail of Tears brochure. To learn more visit: http://www.nps.gov/trte/index.htm

Waynesville: On The Banks of The Roubidoux

Whether it’s the beauty of a summer sunset over the Roubidoux Spring, the breathtaking fall foliage along Historic Route 66, or the charm of the downtown square, Waynesville has something to offer everyone. Even Santa doesn’t miss “Christmas On The Square” in December! Waynesville’s possibilities range from historic attractions to award-winning fishing, from underwater caves to beautiful parks, from modern-day excitement to echoes of the past.

The giant Frog Rock, W.H. Croaker, greets visitors as they arrive in downtown Waynesville. The huge painted rock is a Waynesville landmark that hints to visitors they’ve entered a city with a personality all its own.

The giant Frog Rock, W.H. Croaker, greets visitors as they arrive in downtown Waynesville. The huge painted rock is a Waynesville landmark that hints to visitors they’ve entered a city with a personality all its own.

Consider yourself a history buff? With a namesake like Revolutionary War hero “Mad Anthony” Wayne, Waynesville is as rich in history as its name suggests. The oldest city in Pulaski County, it has been a trading post for trappers and pioneers, a rest stop for stagecoaches traveling west, and an encampment for the infamous Trail of Tears. It has hosted battles and skirmishes in the Civil War and established its popularity with travelers and day-trippers alike with the development of Route 66. Waynesville’s history is immortalized in several downtown museums.

The 1903 Courthouse Musuem in Downtown Waynesville.

Photo courtesy of Denise Seevers

 

If modern-day fun holds more appeal, spend the day at beautiful Roubidoux Spring to experience the area’s best trout fishing at one of the few urban trout streams. The famous spring is also home to an underwater cave that draws certified cave divers from around the globe. In 1837, the spring was a site along the infamous Trail of Tears during the Cherokee removal.

If modern-day fun holds more appeal, spend the day at beautiful Roubidoux Spring to experience the area’s best trout fishing at one of the few urban trout streams. The famous spring is also home to an underwater cave that draws certified cave divers from around the globe. In 1837, the spring was a site along the infamous Trail of Tears during the Cherokee removal.

Photo courtesy of Connie Feighery

Take an afternoon stroll on the walking trail that joins Waynesville and Laughlin Park for a refreshing tour along the Roubidoux River, or gather the family for a picnic in one of the pavilions to please any crowd.