History & Heroes: Five Fast Facts- Mark Hanna

Pulaski County Missouri History and Heroes

Marcus Alonzo Hanna, Ohio Senator, was the namesake of the community and post office of Hanna, Missouri in Pulaski County.

Mark Hanna photographed in 1896 by W. J. Root.

Mark Hanna photographed in 1896 by W. J. Root.

1. Hanna attended the same public school, Cleveland (OH) Central High School, as John D. Rockefeller. Hanna attended Western Reserve College but was expelled for a prank.

2. Hanna, who “had as much to do with the election of [President] Mr. Garfield as any single individual in the country,” oversaw Garfield’s body after it arrived in Cleveland following the assassination of the President. Hanna was also in charge of Garfield’s funeral arrangements and burial.

3. Hanna was instrumental in the election of William McKinley as President in 1896. A New York reporter wrote “Hanna and the others will shuffle and deal him [McKinley] like a pack of cards.” The campaign to elect McKinley, organized by Hanna, raised $3.5 million dollars- the largest election fundraising at that time. Hanna had been credited with the invention of the modern presidential campaign.

4. After winning the Presidency, McKinley offered the Secretary of State position to Senator John Sherman. Sherman accepted which led to Ohio Governor Asa Bushnell appointing Hanna in Senator Sherman’s place.

5. Hanna was no fan of Theodore Roosevelt. He once stated “Here’s this convention going headlong for Roosevelt for Vice President. Don’t any of you realize that there’s only one life between that madman and the Presidency? … What harm can he do as Governor of New York compared to the damage he will do as President if McKinley should die?” After the 1900 Republican Convention did indeed nominate Roosevelt to the ticket as McKinley’s Vice-President Hanna told President McKinley “Your duty to the country is to live for four years from next March.” McKinley won reelection and was assassinated in 1901. Roosevelt assumed the Presidency.

Sources:
https://www.cleveland.com/opinion/index.ssf/2012/10/how_ohio_made_a_president_mark.html
https://potus-geeks.livejournal.com/759386.html

History & Heroes: Five Fast Facts is an occasional series of interesting facts regarding namesakes and historical figures in Pulaski County, Missouri.

 

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History & Heroes: Five Fast Facts- Champ Clark

Pulaski County Missouri History and Heroes

James Beauchamp “Champ” Clark was the namesake of Clark National Forest in Missouri. A portion of this National Forest was located within the boundaries of Pulaski County, Missouri. In 1973 CNF was “administratively combined” with Mark Twain National Forest. In 1976 Clark National Forest was absorbed by Mark Twain National Forest. 39,177 acres of MTNF are located inside Pulaski County.

“Champ” Clark as photographed by Fred Hartsook circa 1915. Retrieved via Library of Congress Prints and Photographs division.

1. Clark was expelled from Kentucky University (now Transylvania University) after firing a pistol at one of his roommates in self-defense during a quarrel. Two years later he was invited to return but he chose Bethany College instead. He graduated first in his class in 1873
2. Clark fervently believed that a good speech needed to include information from literature and history. “The wealth of his biographical material, his quotations, and his historical allusions, as well as the manner in which he adapted them to his speeches” earned him the title the “Leather-Bound Orator.”
3. In 1911, while representing Missouri’s Ninth District in the United States House of Representatives Clark was elected Speaker of the House. Clark has been described as “a fiery orator, a challenging foe in debate, and a witty, but nonetheless perceptive spokesman for the Democratic party.” He remains the only Speaker of the House from the Show Me State.
4. Clark was a shoe-in for the 1912 Democratic Presidential nomination (and most likely the Presidency) until he wasn’t. Clark never received the two-thirds majority at the Baltimore Convention. After forty-six rounds of voting the nod went to Woodrow Wilson who was elected the twenty-eighth President of the United States.
5. Clark’s residence in Bowling Green, Missouri, nicknamed Honeyshuck, is a National Historic Landmark.

Sources:
https://shsmo.org/historicmissourians/name/c/clark
http://digital.shsmo.org/cdm/ref/collection/mhr/id/28139
https://dnr.mo.gov/shpo/nps-nr/76001114.pdf

History & Heroes: Five Fast Facts is an occasional series of interesting facts regarding namesakes and historical figures in Pulaski County, Missouri.

History & Heroes: Five Fast Facts- Mark Twain

Pulaski County Missouri History and Heroes

Mark Twain National Forest in southern and central Missouri is named in honor of author, newspaperman, and humorist Mark Twain. 39,177 acres of MTNF are located in Pulaski County in the Houston-Rolla-Cedar Creek Ranger District.

Samuel Clemens, pen name Mark Twain, as photographed in 1871 by Mathew Brady. Retrieved via Library of Congress Prints and Photographs division. This work is in the public domain in its country of origin and other countries and areas where the copyright term is the author's life plus 100 years or less.

Samuel Clemens, pen name Mark Twain, as photographed in 1871 by Mathew Brady. Retrieved via Library of Congress Prints and Photographs division. This work is in the public domain in its country of origin and other countries and areas where the copyright term is the author’s life plus 100 years or less.

1. Mark Twain was born Samuel Langhorne Clemens in Florida, Missouri. He grew up alongside the Mississippi River in Hannibal. His pen name, Mark Twain, was a riverboat term that he would have heard frequently as a child and used often during his career as a steamboat pilot.
2. Twain was also an inventor. In 1871 he received the patent for an adjustable garment strap. In 1873 he invented and patented a self-pasting scrapbook. In 1891 he marketed his patented “Mark Twain’s Memory Builder Game.”
3. The Panic of 1893 pushed Twain’s publishing firm into bankruptcy in 1894. This led to potential personal bankruptcy. To stave off his own bankruptcy Twain made a year-long around-the-world lecture tour to pay off his debts.
4. In 1900 Twain traveled to England to argue copyright law before the House of Lords.
5. In 1998 the Kennedy Center established the Mark Twain Prize for American Humor. Recipients include Lily Tomlin, George Carlin, and Ellen DeGeneres.

Sources:
https://www.marktwainmuseum.org/twains-life-and-works
http://biography.yourdictionary.com/articles/facts-about-mark-twain.html

History & Heroes: Five Fast Facts is an occasional series of interesting facts regarding namesakes and historical figures in Pulaski County, Missouri.

History & Heroes: Five Fast Facts- Leonard Wood

Pulaski County Missouri History and Heroes

Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri is named in honor of United States Army officer Leonard Wood.

General Leonard Wood, via Wikimedia Commons.

General Leonard Wood, via Wikimedia Commons.

1. Wood served as personal physician to Presidents Grover Cleveland and William McKinley.
2. Wood, and future president Theodore Roosevelt, organized the Rough Riders, “one of the most unique army units the world has ever seen.” The unit was comprised of “western fighters and bronco-busters.”
3. While Military Governor of Cuba (1898-1902) Wood sanctioned Walter Reed, a U.S. Army physician, to carry out experiments that confirmed the theory that yellow fever is transmitted by mosquitoes. Wood called the conquest of yellow fever “worth the cost of the war, and probably the most important (advance) in the field of medicine since the discovery of the vaccination.”
4. Wood received the literary wrath of popular American author Mark Twain after the First Battle of Bud Dajo, also known as the Moro Crater Massacre.
5. Wood, on former President Roosevelt’s recommendation, ran for the 1920 Republican Party presidential nomination. Warren G. Harding prevailed and went on to win the presidency.

Sources:
http://www.theodorerooseveltcenter.org
The Marion Star (Marion, Ohio), 6 January 1919
http://www.ralphmag.org/EC/yellow-fever.html
Samuel Clemens, “Comments on the Moro Massacre” (12 March 1906)

History & Heroes: Five Fast Facts is an occasional series of interesting facts regarding namesakes and historical figures in Pulaski County, Missouri.

History & Heroes: Five Fast Facts- Anthony Wayne

Pulaski County Missouri History and Heroes

Waynesville, Missouri is named in honor of American Revolutionary War hero Anthony Wayne.

624px-Anthony_Wayne

1. Wayne once requested his own court martial proceedings- to clear his name. After due consideration, the court unanimously decided that Wayne “did every duty that could be expected from an active, brave and vigilant officer, under the orders which he then had. The Court do acquit him with the highest honor.” Washington heartily approved the verdict.
2. Brigadier General “Mad” Anthony Wayne commanded his troops in a daring nighttime assault at Stony Point, New York. The British were soundly defeated, and the American victory boosted the Continental Army’s morale.
3. Wayne is remembered for stating “Issue the orders Sir, and I will storm hell.”
4. In 1882 the monument at Wayne’s second burial spot at Radnor, Pennsylvania was defaced by relic hunters- a “decided nuisance.”
5. Wayne was first buried near the place of his death at Erie, Pennsylvania. In 1809 his son decided to have him reburied closer to the old homestead in Eastern Pennsylvania and directed a physician to complete the task. On opening the grave, the body was found in “a good state of preservation.” Concerned about decay during the return trip, the doctor, who was expecting to find only a pile of bones in the coffin, boiled the body parts until only the skeletal remains remained. The physician then reburied the knives, the iron kettle, and the fleshy remains in the original burial spot. He then returned to Radnor, PA to rebury the bones at the new grave. A newspaper article relaying the story reported “So General Anthony Wayne is honored with a twofold burial, his flesh in Erie and his bones in Eastern Pennsylvania.” Oral history also tells that not all the hero’s bones made it to their final resting place in Radnor- some bouncing out along the way. Legend recounts that the ghost of Mad Anthony Wayne travels the old road between the two points looking for his lost bones.

Sources:

http://www.ushistory.org/valleyforge/served/wayne.html
St. Joseph Weekly Herald (St. Joseph, Missouri) 13 July 1882
The Weston Democrat (Weston, West Virginia) 23 October 1880
https://www.historyisfun.org/blog/mad-anthony-waynes-bones

History & Heroes: Five Fast Facts is an occasional series of interesting facts regarding namesakes and historical figures in Pulaski County, Missouri.

History & Heroes: Five Fast Facts- Casimir Pulaski

Pulaski County Missouri History and Heroes

Pulaski County, Missouri is named in honor of Kazimierz Michał Władysław Wiktor Pułaski, more commonly known as Casimir Pulaski.

Image via Wikipedia

Image via Wikipedia

  1. Pulaski saved George Washington’s life during the Battle of Brandywine. The battle was Pulaski’s very first engagement with the British.
  2. The cornerstone of the Casimir Pulaski monument in Savannah, Georgia was laid by General Marquis de Lafayette in 1825.
  3. In 2009, 230 years after his death, Congress and President Obama proclaimed Pulaski an honorary United States citizen.
  4. The annual Pulaski Day Parade on Fifth Avenue in New York City has been a tradition for 80 years, beginning in 1937.
  5. Pulaski is often recognized as the “Father of the American Cavalry.”

Sources:
https://www.congress.gov/111/plaws/publ94/PLAW-111publ94.htm
http://www.pulaskiparade.org/
https://www.nps.gov/fopu/learn/historyculture/casimir-pulaski.htm

History & Heroes: Five Fast Facts is an occasional series of interesting facts regarding namesakes and historical figures in Pulaski County, Missouri.